Does the program matter if everything else sucks?

I don’t want to have a debate over what type of program is best or what type of program elicits the biggest gains, the most sweat, or the most likes on Instagram. I think many different programs can work and to be honest its more about execution then it is the program itself. There are a hundred things that can make one program seem better then another. Is the person using the program consistent? How is their diet? What is their intensity during training? What is their stress level outside of the gym? We can go on and on about this, but today I just want to focus on one key issue that can separate one program from the next, technique. Do you really focus on your technique? Can you control your body in both the eccentric and concentric phase of the lift, and even isometrically hold the lift if its needed?

I see too many programs that are so focused on tempo, de-loading, progressive overload, along with many more variables. Don’t get me wrong, these factors are important, and all can play a key role in making or breaking a training program. But do you really own your technique. You can give the worst program in the world to someone who has the best technique and they will get something out of it, and you can give the best program in the world to someone with the worst technique, and the program will be more useless then Kim Kardashian on Jeopardy.

Movements to Master:
Hip Hinge
Squat
Bodyweight Horizontal Press
Bodyweight Vertical Pull
Single Leg Hip Hinge
Split Stance Lunge
Horizontal Hip Extension
Horizontal Pull

Here are just a few off the top of my head, and I am sure we can add to this list, but do you own these movements. Owning these movements will be a challenge for many people, which brings us back to simplicity, stop worrying about linear, undulating, German volume training, etc, and start worrying about the execution of the lifts themselves. Better execution of the movements will in itself allow for more creativity and openness in the program.

Happy Training,

Brett Cummins